ISACA CISM Training Course

Cybersecurity training for leaders

Course Overview

Designed specifically for managers, Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) is one of the most highly coveted - and highest paid - cybersecurity certifications out there. Our 5-day course provides the deep-dive into cybersecurity best practice you'll need to become a cyber visionary in your organization, and of course pass the CISM exam (which satisfies DoD 810/8570 requirements) with flying colors.

PERSONAL

Live Instructor

 

Our most interactive learning mode provides maximum face-to-face interaction.

From $3095

Live Online

 

Delivered by a live instructor - you attend virtually from your home or office.

From $3095

BUSINESS

Group Training

 

Bring our world-class instructors on site to deliver interactive CISM training to your whole team.

 

UPCOMING COURSES

No public courses are currently scheduled, but we can deliver this course onsite at your location. Contact us for a quote.

Need training for a group?

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

In this course, you’ll get an in-depth look at the four CISM domains that largely make up the exam. The four domains are Information Security Governance, Information Risk Management and Compliance, Information Security Program Development and Management, and Information Security Incident Management.

While there aren’t any prerequisites to take the CISM training course itself, you’ll need five years of relevant security experience to qualify for certification through ISACA (along with appropriate education and signing off on the CISM Code of Professional Ethics).

It’s a three-day class.

Individuals who hold the PMP certification will earn 24 PDUs through the course.

You’ll get a course book, practice exams, and a CISM exam voucher. Of course, your tuition also includes priceless group activities and and discussions and bagels.

Short answer: Yes. CISM certification will qualify you for IAM Level 2. If you’re looking or more detail on DoD 8570 and the various training options for compliance, check out our DoD 8570 overview.

CISM certification is geared toward Cybersecurity management and leadership, so you’re best suited for this course if you’ve had five years of security experience. That said, it’s a good course for anyone interested in learning more about the four domains, sitting for the CISM exam, and/or satisfying the DoD 8140/8570 training requirements.

The CISM exam consists of 150 multiple choice questions, to be completed within four hours. A passing score is 450/800 or higher. It will focus on the four domains:

  • Information Security Governance: 24%
  • Information Risk Management: 30%
  • Information Security Program Development & Management: 27%
  • Information Security Incident Management: 19%

You’ll receive an exam voucher from your instructor while you’re in class. You’ll use that voucher to sit for the exam at a PSI testing center. You’ll take the exam on a computer (not paper), and you’ll see immediately whether you passed or failed, though you won’t get your exact score until a week or so later. If you pass, you’ll get instructions on what to do next.

Welllll, not quite. But passing is a critical step! To get officially certified through ISACA (the CISM governing body), you’ll need to submit an application for their review. To be approved and certified, you’ll need to prove you’ve passed the exam within the last five years, have five years of full-time relevant work experience, and agree to a professional code of ethics.

To maintain CISM certification through ISACA, you’ll need to acquire and report a minimum of 20 CPEs each year. There’s also an annual maintenance fee, which varies according to whether or not you’re an ISACA member.

COURSE SYLLABUS

  • Establish and/or maintain an information security strategy in alignment with organizational goals and objectives to guide the establishment and/or ongoing management of the information security program.
  • Establish and/or maintain an information security governance framework to guide activities that support the information security strategy.
  • Integrate information security governance into corporate governance to ensure that organizational goals and objectives are supported by the information security program.
  • Establish and maintain information security policies to guide the development of standards, procedures and guidelines in alignment with enterprise goals and objectives.
  • Develop business cases to support investments in information security.
  • Identify internal and external influences to the organization (e.g., emerging technologies, social media, business environment, risk tolerance, regulatory requirements, third-party considerations, threat landscape) to ensure that these factors are continually addressed by the information security strategy.
  • Gain ongoing commitment from senior leadership and other stakeholders to support the successful implementation of the information security strategy.
  • Define, communicate, and monitor information security responsibilities throughout the organization (e.g., data owners, data custodians, end users, privileged or high-risk users) and lines of authority.
  • Establish, monitor, evaluate and report key information security metrics to provide management with accurate and meaningful information regarding the effectiveness of the information security strategy.
  • Establish and/or maintain a process for information asset classification to ensure that measures taken to protect assets are proportional to their business value.
  • Identify legal, regulatory, organizational and other applicable requirements to manage the risk of noncompliance to acceptable levels.
  • Ensure that risk assessments, vulnerability assessments and threat analyses are conducted consistently, at appropriate times, and to identify and assess risk to the organization’s information.
  • Identify, recommend or implement appropriate risk treatment/response options to manage risk to acceptable levels based on organizational risk appetite.
  • Determine whether information security controls are appropriate and effectively manage risk to an acceptable level.
  • Facilitate the integration of information risk management into business and IT processes (e.g., systems development, procurement, project management) to enable a consistent and comprehensive information risk management program across the organization.
  • Monitor for internal and external factors (e.g., key risk indicators [KRIs], threat landscape, geopolitical, regulatory change) that may require reassessment of risk to ensure that changes to existing, or new, risk scenarios are identified and managed appropriately.
  • Report noncompliance and other changes in information risk to facilitate the risk management decision-making process.
  • Ensure that information security risk is reported to senior management to support an understanding of potential impact on the organizational goals and objectives.
  • Establish and/or maintain the information security program in alignment with the information security strategy.
  • Align the information security program with the operational objectives of other business functions (e.g., human resources [HR], accounting, procurement and IT) to ensure that the information security program adds value to and protects the business.
  • Identify, acquire and manage requirements for internal and external resources to execute the information security program.
  • Establish and maintain information security processes and resources (including people and technologies) to execute the information security program in alignment with the organization’s business goals.
  • Establish, communicate and maintain organizational information security standards, guidelines, procedures and other documentation to guide and enforce compliance with information security policies.
  • Establish, promote and maintain a program for information security awareness and training to foster an effective security culture.
  • Integrate information security requirements into organizational processes (e.g., change control, mergers and acquisitions, system development, business continuity, disaster recovery) to maintain the organization’s security strategy.
  • Integrate information security requirements into contracts and activities of third parties (e.g., joint ventures, outsourced providers, business partners, customers) and monitor adherence to established requirements in order to maintain the organization’s security strategy.
  • Establish, monitor and analyze program management and operational metrics to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of the information security program.
  • Compile and present reports to key stakeholders on the activities, trends and overall effectiveness of the IS program and the underlying business processes in order to communicate security performance.
  • Establish and maintain an organizational definition of, and severity hierarchy for, information security incidents to allow accurate classification and categorization of and response to incidents.
  • Establish and maintain an incident response plan to ensure an effective and timely response to information security incidents.
  • Develop and implement processes to ensure the timely identification of information security incidents that could impact the business.
  • Establish and maintain processes to investigate and document information security incidents in order to determine the appropriate response and cause while adhering to legal, regulatory and organizational requirements.
  • Establish and maintain incident notification and escalation processes to ensure that the appropriate stakeholders are involved in incident response management.
  • Organize, train and equip incident response teams to respond to information security incidents in an effective and timely manner.
  • Test, review and revise (as applicable) the incident response plan periodically to ensure an effective response to information security incidents and to improve response capabilities.
  • Establish and maintain communication plans and processes to manage communication with internal and external entities.
  • Conduct post-incident reviews to determine the root cause of information security incidents, develop corrective actions, reassess risk, evaluate response effectiveness and take appropriate remedial actions.
  • Establish and maintain integration among the incident response plan, business continuity plan and disaster recovery plan.

Why Beyond20

How We Teach

People learn differently, so we use a variety of methods to teach concepts throughout the course. In addition to exam preparation and practice quizzes, you'll engage in round-table discussions, group exercises, and games designed to give practical context to the concepts. We take this approach not only because it's more interesting and fun than simply memorizing vocabulary, but because it works.

All of our instructors are experienced practitioners with real world cyber security expertise. (Real experience, too. Like, former-CIO-level experience.)

We're a US-based organization with offices in DC, Phoenix, and San Diego.

Industry-Leading Course Materials

All of our courseware is reviewed multiple times a year to ensure it's up to date, in line with best practice standards, and effective! We incorporate feedback from students to constantly improve our course books, in-class activities, and (sorry) homework. The goal is to provide you with the tools to not only get you through class and pass the exam, but also to have a reliable reference when you get back to the office.

We don't just teach to the exam (though we certainly do that), we also give you practical and personalized tools you can take back to work.

We're a Registered Education Provider with PMI, so if you're PMP Certified, the course will earn you PDUs!

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